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Ian Cuthbert - 26 Mar 2018
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If the Guardian is serious about tackling anti-semitism in politics - and they should be - I'll be waiting for the next exposé on anti-semitism in the Conservative Party...

Jeremy Corbyn should absolutely be held to account for his words and actions over an anti-semitic mural, as should anyone else. He should give a clear response and distance himself from those who attempt to hide their anti-semitism behind legitimate human rights causes. Labour and its leadership clearly still has a lot of hard work to do to stamp out anti-semitism. The same is true in pretty much every corner of politics, and wider society, in the UK.

There are clear grounds to directly challenge some people on the left who do not grasp the simple idea (which should be so obvious to any socialist) that none of us are equal unless we are all equal. It's sickening to see, so often, the playing off of the rights of one group of humanity against another. I come across it constantly and have frequently been accused of being both anti-semitic AND supporting Islamophobic and anti-Palestinian positions as a result. I am, apparently, an apologist for Hamas terrorism AND illegal Israeli military action in Palestine simultaneously.

When our views are so divided and impact so deeply on the daily lives of our fellow human beings, we all have a responsibility to listen, learn and challenge our own prejudices. Dare I say it, but I think Jeremy Corbyn tries to do this more than your average human.

AND (because it's possible not to tackle more than one issue at a time)...

...those who use this serious matter to cause damage to Labour - both from within and without the party - on the eve of important elections should also be held to account. Their actions and words undermine the tireless work of thousands of activists who fight anti-semitism, racism and fascism day in day out. In this respect, I find it very hard to understand why the Guardian chose to run a headline all morning which casts Jeremy Corbyn as a leader of anti-semitism. However well founded the allegations are about the incident which sparked this debate, when the Guardian has a breaking story about election corruption which implicates people at the highest levels of government. Yes, they have a story worth covering, but I challenge their editorial decision about what story should get top billing. If the Guardian is serious about tackling anti-semitism in politics - and they should be - I'll be waiting for the next exposé on anti-semitism in the Conservative Party, because that particular party is riddled with anti-semites, racists and proto-fascists and we never seem to hear much about them.

2 Comments

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Andy Williamson

In the coverage I've heard and read of this so far, I haven't come across a single attempt to give actual examples of where there 'is antisemitism in Labour', other than mentioning Corbyn's own apology for his initial reaction to the mural.

(is there one word too many in this line?
AND (because it's possible not to tackle more than one issue at a time)... )

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Ian Cuthbert

I've come across it repeatedly this week in online conversations with people who claim to be supporting Jeremy Corbyn. They are a discredit to Jeremy and to the party.

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